Federal Association

BVMW Chief Ohoven calls for tax and tax cut Berlin/Munich medium-sized companies go through a rollercoaster of emotions. In July, it was still high oil prices, which are all shocked and dampened the positive development of in recent years, the specter of the international financial crisis now holds the German economy on tenterhooks. Worldwide credit and financing systems are out of the joints, because banks no longer trust each other and lend to each other hardly. Instead, strong financial institutions are considered as possible not to belittle their liquidity. This has resulted in banks make very reluctant loose money. Meanwhile, lending is very restrictive and only against high collateral as well as expensive interest rates. It is therefore harder to come that they desperately need for new investment in projects as well as research and development of foreign capital for many companies with low equity capital and credit. Long ago, the Bank is no longer the usual lender \”previous times and need companies to look for other sources of money\”, the computer week reported.

The problem is not new however. Mario Ohoven, President of the Federal Association of medium-sized business (BVMW) had made a more rigorous lending policy of the money houses compared to the middle class at the end of last year and again denounced this fact in the spring. Already at that time he attested to a growing shortages and higher prices of corporate loans in the wake of the banking crisis according to polls in the middle class. To bypass the credit bottlenecks, contingency plans are essential. As a replacement for traditional bank loans, Ohoven renames for example shareholder loans, lease-back method, factoring, leasing, mezzanine, or the issue of participatory notes. The BVMW Chief appeared in the spring almost as the lone caller in the desert, while other institutions more small talked the danger of banking and credit crisis, reality caught up now all and suggests the scarcity of foreign capital with full effect on German By company.